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Trans Theatre Festival: Sandy Gooen and Pass/Fail

The Trans Theatre Festival 2018 at the Brick, 579 Metropolitan Ave in Brooklyn. Presents Pass/Fail

Pass/Fail is a new play by Sandy Gooen, whose Twitter is @featsandygooen. A play about friendship, belonging, and, well, passing. The story follows Johnny, who is a transmasculine student at a women’s college, and his best friend Noah, who is a cis gay man at the Ivy League across the street. Directed by Donnie Cianciotto, the rather large cast (for an indie theater production) includes Sydney Ronis, Marc David Wright, Hannah Roze, Rebecca Cianciotto, Emily Mervosh, Jane Marie Price, Jacob Michael, Jonathan Hernandez, Emily McNally.

The Brick is overjoyed to continue it’s annual trans theater festival to celebrate the stories, art, histories, and experiences of trans artists. Recognizing trans artists as an invaluable part of our arts community, both currently and historically, this festival is part of an ongoing commitment to elevating their work. For this and many other reasons, The Brick is proud to present a theater and arts festival curated by and featuring the work of Trans Artists.

So Sandy, tell us about yourself as an artist

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I’m still very much a work in progress, as I’m only just about to finish my undergrad degree in music, but I have been involved in music and/or theatre for a majority of my life. My experiences inform my work, and with Pass/Fail in particular, I have had to look inward, but also deconstruct my experiences from other perspectives. Not all of my work is this personal. I consider myself a storyteller, and I do this through many media, but above all, I know that’s what I’m here to do. 

Share with us a little something about your play that we WON’T see in the press release.

In the script, I have a writer’s note that sums up the ideal experience of every person in the room, the actors, the audience, and myself included: “lean into the discomfort.” I call it a dark comedy. But the real genre is “it’s funny, because it’s awkward, because it’s true.” It covers heightened, complex truths. 

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How does your play resonate today? Feel free to be blunt. 

For everyone, I think the play is a moment to feel empathy and awkward about the way that trans people are treated. We also touch on the gender dynamics that currently exist inside academia and the infighting in the LGBT community, as well as, friendship, love, and the struggle to own one’s  identity. Those are timeless topics! 

Why did you choose The Trans Theatre Festival for your work?  

While I recently debuted a song about tokenism, and I don’t really love feeling like I have to only do “trans” shows, I enjoy getting to work with my community and the opportunity to do my work. I hope that trans artists can continue to go beyond our transness, or rather bring it with us into a broader world. 

Where do you see it going in the future? What’s the next step?  

I hope that people are interested and it gets people talking. Pass/Fail is one of many of my projects, but I’d really love to see it get to a bigger space with a real budget, and a fuller production, because I want there to be a wider spread dialogue about these issues. So, I might keep talking to folks and submitting it elsewhere. 

Final thoughts? 

My director, Donnie, and my whole team are people without whom this couldn’t be happening. It’s really exciting to have more trans artists in the room besides myself, and to have cis artists who are willing to learn and listen onboard as well. One of biggest cis allies in theatre thus far has been my playwriting professor, Andy Bragen, who encouraged me to write Pass/Fail in the first place. 

 

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EV A-OK!

The Trans Theatre Festival 2018

July 9 – 22, 2018

The Brick | 579 Metropolitan Ave | Brooklyn NY

Running virtually simultaneous with the celebrated Fresh Fruit Festival is the innovative Trans Theatre Festival July 9 – 22. The Caffe Cino Fellowship Award winning Brick Theatre, located in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, was founded in 2002 by Robert Honeywell and Michael Gardner and has been home to many critically acclaimed premieres. Winning such honors as NYIT and ITBA Awards and Time Out New York’s Top Ten Plays, The Brick hosted some of downtown theater’s most innovative artists, including Annie BakerYoung Jean Lee, The Debate Society, Thomas Bradshaw, and Nick Jones. The Brick is overjoyed to continue its annual Trans Theater Festival celebrating the power and the art of Trans artists. The best way to contact The Brick is by email:
info@bricktheater.com

One of the more accessible yet imaginative pieces at this year’s festival features EV and some fluffy co-stars: a mermaid, a ballerina, a very rambunctious 12 year old, and a bird. No need to call Equity … these are puppets!  Written and Directed By EV Fitzgerald. Modern thought and powerful words are located just a few blocks from Sesame Street and across from Avenue Q. In a more elevated section of town.

Late Night with EV and Puppets

ONE-NIGHT-ONLY: July 13, 2018 at 7:00 p.m.

How many late-night TV talk-shows feature a mermaid, a ballerina, a very rambunctious 12 year old, and a bird. Join the talk of dreams, desires, and good old fashion community love. It’s the show that’s sweeping the nation! (at least in the host’s mind). http://thefreekstheater.wixsite.com/freeks

 

The puppets were busy so we sat-down with EV Fitzgerald.  And we’re so glad. EV is one of the most articulate individuals we’ve had the please to interview. 

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Tell us about yourself as an artist

Since I have been performing alone, my work often comes from a place of vulnerability and autobiography. Before I came out to my friends and family as trans, I performed in a variety of plays in school and college and with the Freeks, an immersive performance group that I helped found. In all of these plays I was cast as an ostensibly male figure: a wisecracking pedant in Blithe Spirit, the murdered drunk husband in Five Little Pigs, the old broken pawn shop owner in American Buffalo. These performances felt anything but honest. In fact I remember remarking to my sister, who is also a performer, about how acting to me felt a wholly outside-in process. This experience birthed a certain cerebral approach to performance that played well for clowns or alienated mad men. Accordingly I was a Brecht devotee and loved the work for its weighty and synthetic approach to the theater. When I saw a performance inspired by the work of Jerzy Grotowski, however, something within me began to crack open, an egg began to hatch. It struck me that I had never really ‘played myselves’ on the stage. In my personal life, I was beginning to have the same realization. I hope that by shedding my skin on the streets and on the stage, by showing the vast multiplicity of myselves, I may inspire the same journey inwards and then outwards in others.

That was inspiring and really brilliant. Let’s delve deeper. Share with us a little something about your play that we WON’T see in the press release.

 I think one of the hardest thing to capture about any artistic endeavour is how much it owes to the vast multitudes of others involved in the life of the artists. While we try our level best to include ‘thank yous’ and ‘acknowledgements’, there is no way that I can truly capture the multitude of individuals that emerge prismatically from my work. Every person from my closest friend to a stranger across from me on the subway to a show that evening comes out in my work. I can’t even begin to describe this process in a way that is not the work or the world itself.

I’m sure you thought of this already. How does your play resonate today? Feel free to be blunt.

There is a tendency in today’s media and art to reduce complex issues to single line issues. This is certainly beneficial in terms of political expediency and absolutely necessary in cases such as protecting marginalized folx from state violence or righting the legacy of injustices committed against them.

It is not as common, however, to lay bare the multiplicity (read intersection) of identities found in our world. As a white pansexual non-binary trans woman, I find myself at the intersection of a variety of contemporary issues: white supremacy, Queer politics, trans erasure, non-binary erasure, violence perpetrated by men, emotional disregard for males, hatred of femininity, and mistrust of trans women by some cis folks, just to name a few. In each of these issues I stand at different points and the act of telling my story and my perspective is one piece in understanding the complex fabric in which we live.

My work may not serve as politically expedient as Walter Benjamin or Bertolt Brecht would wish. It is not a single “What if…”. I hope it will serve as a multitude of “what ifs” and a prompt for questions, not a single answer.

Why did you choose the Trans Theater Festival ? 

My work is first for trans audiences specifically, but I also hope that it will be a place for cis and trans folx to begin conversations about their common struggles. It is not just trans women that face stereotypes about femininity for example. Cis men and women are often challenged by the oppressive binary lines upon which we lay gender. I hope that this production may be a stimulus for folks to reach across a certain metaphorical aisle. Not one divided by political ideals, but rather one divided by thousands of years of stereotype and enforced behaviors. I hope that my work can make these folx themselves in me and in turn each other.

Where do you see it going in the future? What’s the next step? 

I hope that my work could engage a wider audience and serve as a stimulus for a discussion about gender diversity within our culture. By employing a larger cast as well as technological tools, like projections and voice over, I would hope to increase the immersive quality of the show for larger audiences as well as provide other trans* and queer folx with opportunities to show their work in the context of the little dream world that I build.

I also hope to do further academic research on how puppets may influence perception about gender and identity in general. Building on work like Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s “doll test” as well as studies from developmental psychology about identification with objects perceived as agents, I propose that abstracted figures (i.e. puppets, cartoons, gesture drawings, and other ambiguous human figures) encourage the human mind to construct their own sense of identity rather than consume those ready-made by the culture around them.

Final thoughts?

I always carry this Walt Whitman quote around me and I want to share it with the world as frequently as I can. I first read “Song of Myself” in high school and remember how taken I was by the way in which Whitman truly understood the contradictory nature of human freedom. He endeavoured to describe, before modern psychology would even dare, the strange fact that while we are essentially analogous organisms we come in such a plethora of forms:  inextricably tied to one other and irrevocably individual.

At one point during his reflection on these themes he proclaims:

                                 Do I contradict myself?

                                Very well then I contradict myself,

                                (I am large, I contain multitudes.)

 Whitman’s words are a rallying cry for Queer folx everywhere, for folx who don’t fit the mold that politicians and pedants seek to craft and stuff us all in, and for folx that long to be closer than the orbits of atoms to their fellows.

                                Read them.

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: BROADWAY PRODUCER, JIM KIERSTEAD

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Why are we interviewing Jim Kierstead?

Because he’s a two-time 2013 Tony® Award-winning producer of the Broadway productions of Kinky Boots (book by Harvey Fierstein and music & lyrics by Cyndi Lauper) and the critically acclaimed revival of Pippin?

NO

He also is involved with the international hit musical Matilda on Broadway?

NOPE

Because he is a co-producer of the 2016 Broadway musicals Waitress, Natasha & Pierre,  and The Great Comet of 1812? 

The Natasha part was groovy but that’s not it.

Because Jim Kierstead is STILL a powerful supporter of independent theatre. It all began for him with the critically acclaimed Off-Broadway premiere of Thrill Me – The Leopold & Loeb Story (nominated for Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle Awards for Best Musical in 2005) and produced its original New York production in 2003 at the Midtown International Theatre Festival. Mr. Kierstead supports and respects the work of the independent artist in laudable ways. He is currently producing DEAD BRAINS, a play by Erik Champney at this season’s Planet Connections Theatre Festivity.

Additionally, Jim is in the process of developing a new musical entitled Unexpected Joy with book & lyrics by Bill Russell (two-time Tony® nominated for Side Show) and music by Janet Hood. Jim is on the Board of Directors of The York Theatre Company.

And that ain’t all:

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

So it’s not like he isn’t busy.

Sir, it’s an honor.

A couple of questions….

Tell us about yourself as an artist and a theater professional. 

 
IMG_1605Adjusted.jpgI began my career as a theatre producer near 20 years ago after seeing the original production of Side Show in 1998.  Although it didn’t last long, it made a lasting impression on me and I realized that I needed to be a part of this world.  From that day, opportunities began to present themselves and I knew that my destiny was to do a few things…  the first was to bring my business experience and my love of theatre together to present important material that would entertain people while, at the same time, pass along important messages that as an individual I would never be able to get across on my own.  I also wanted to help the voices of artists who I respected who may or may not have gotten attention to have their work heard and seen.  And, most importantly, I wanted to treat my theatre collaborators as I was taught to do in the business world…   with kindness and respect.  Giving people a safe place to work and to create is the best gift I could give anyone.
Priase to you for supporting indie theater, what keeps you coming back? 
 
Thank you.  I love indie theatre because it gives me a chance to try out and “test drive” new pieces before the public.  I’m not afraid to go to difficult subject matter and areas that may or not be seen to be work others want to see.  But I only judge material based on what I like myself so I enjoy trying out new and edgy material in an experimental space.  The first show I produced, THRILL ME – THE LEOPOLD & LOEB STORY, was premiered in the 2003 Midtown International Theatre Festival in a 50-seat black box at The Abingdon Theatre Company (where I’m now on the Board).  It was originally directed by Martin Charnin and, due to its huge success at the festival, I presented it in an Off-Broadway run at The York Theatre Company (where I’ve been on the Board since then) in 2005 where it was nominated for Best Musical by the Drama Desks and Outer Critics Circle.  Since it was published and recorded those years ago, there has never been a time when it has not been in some sort of production around the world.  I firmly believe in festivals to present new work.  I also presented a play called COVER at the MITF in 2014, which I’m working on for the futture.  Sadly, the MITF no longer exists, but I believe the Planet Connections Festivities is a very worthwhile and special venue to present new work.  This year, it gives me great pleasure to present Erik Champney’s (who I believe is one of the finest new playwrights of our time) new work in this experimental situation.  I’m working with Erik on another piece which is forthcoming.  Theatre does not need to be glamorous or extremely expensive…it only needs to be top quality.  I encourage any experimental theatre to be boiled down to the basics so the material shines through.  If you come to see DEAD BRAINS (and I hope you will!), expect the material to be showcased without any bells and whistles.  Indie theatre supports me just as much as I support it. 
What do you look for in a property? On and off Broadway?
unnamed.jpgI have one piece of criteria that I look for when presenting material.  I have to LOVE it.  Whether my love of a piece translates to Broadway, Off Broadway, or something else only relies on how much I believe others will love it as well (and how much they are willing to pay…sadly, that is the reality of commercial theatre).  Each piece is unique and, since commerciality is a reality of our business and the world, I think and hope that I can find the proper place for a piece based on that.  At this point in time, all I know is that I only want to be part of projects that I love.  The few times I have gone against that rule I have regretted it.   Choose to be a part of a show you love and, win or lose, you WIN! 
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#TenthPlanet: Lynda Crawford

This summer, Planet Connections Theatre Festivity (PCTF), the brainchild of arts professional Glory Kadigan, turns 10 years old. In that decade, PCTF has successfully changed the landscape of the theatre festival and all of New York independent theatre. The multi-award-winning theatre festival will celebrate in a big way by premiering more than 50 timely and topical plays and musicals written by the next generation of playwrights. Each play contains a powerful message serving as a parable of various world themes. The Tenth Planet: Planet Connections Theatre Festivity will run fromJuly 9 through August 5, 2018 at The Clemente, 107 Suffolk Street, NYC.www.planetconnections.org. Artists presenting works from all across America, including Denver, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Providence and New York City; and from all over the planet, including Japan, Yugoslavia, Russia, Peru, France, Belarus, & Haiti are part of this years festivity.

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We were honored to chat with distinguished playwright, Lynda Crawford about Planet Connections special presentation of her latest work.

Thrilled to have you. Tell us about yourself as an artist

I have been writing plays for the last 40 years, with a 15-year hiatus in there while I worked as a journalist. I supported my habit for writing working as a secretary for many years at the UN International School. I was very influenced by that environment and many of my plays have an international feel. This play, STARS OUT OF BALANCE, feels very European to me, and I hope it resonates with what is going on there now with the plight of refugees.

 

Share with us a little something about your play that we WON’T see in the press release.

STARS OUT OF BALANCE was actually inspired initially by a line in another play of mine, Strange Rain (FringeNYC 2013), where a psychic character is talking about a vision he had of a family of acrobats who had become unbalanced by a year of unusual weather, the year without a summer. A friend remarked that they, the acrobats, deserved their own play and I liked that idea. Then a little later I read An Acrobat of the Heart: A Physical Approach to Acting by Stephen Wangh, and was influenced there as well. The play originally had many more characters and, after a couple of readings, I shelved it, but in the last year (after seeing The Showman, which brought to mind my acrobats), I was re-inspired to work on it and rewrote it (now for 5 actors) and refocused it to the situation of a family fleeing war and weather crises—something happening in various parts of the world right now.

 

Sadly, recent world events make me think i know the answer to this already but tell us why play resonates today? Feel free to be blunt. 

Well, it is happening. Families are displaced all over the world because of war and climate change. They live in frightening conditions. How do these men and women survive? And if they are trying to practice art or a craft, how do they keep doing it? And what of the children? Will they have a chance at a future? The protagonist in STARS OUT OF BALANCE is a young girl. 

 

Why did you choose Planet Connections for your work?  Have you worked with them before? 

I like the festival and the people involved. I have participated in Planet Connections in 2016 and 2017 as well. The aspect of finding a charity connected to the work appeals to me. I chose the International Rescue Committee for STARS OUT OF BALANCE, as they help people upended by war and natural disaster.

 

Where do you see it going in the future? What’s the next step?  

I’m very excited to work with Terry Greiss (the director) on this piece in the festival. Working with him helps me to realize the play more fully. After this staged reading, well, I’ll be sending it out to all the usual places, hoping for a production…

 

Final thoughts?  

The challenge for me is to write a play connected to a social issue without it being a diatribe, a mouthpiece, a platform for that issue…where it is a play that stands on its own as a drama, but maybe underneath it we feel the tug of the social issue playing out in front of us. And it opens our hearts a little more.

#TenthPlanet: THIS STRETCH OF MONTPELIER

The Fire This Time Festival & Frigid NYC present a play by Kelley Nicole Girod directed by Andrew Block

In this South Louisiana neighborhood, just past the intersection where Ghosts from the Past cross Hopes for the Future, lies …

illustrated-cover-no-dates (1).jpgTHIS STRETCH OF MONTPELIER

Part of the 10th anniversary season of Planet Connections Theatre Festivity at the Theaters at the Clemente, 107 Suffolk Street, New York City, running Thursday 7/19 @5:45pm-7:15pm; Saturday 7/21 @8:30pm-10pm; Wednesday 7/25 @7:15pm-8:45pm; Sunday 7/29 @ 7pm-8:30pm; Saturday 8/4 @9:30pm-11pm; and Sunday 8/5 @2pm-3:30pm

Obie winner, Kelley Nicole Girod and Ovation winner, Andrew Block forge a play about a place out of time.

Evolution doesn’t have to take millions of years. It can happen right in front of our eyes. Spend a hot summer day along a stretch of Southeastern Louisiana road, where tradition now clashes with change. Old neighbors intertwine with those newcomers, bringing about gentrification… and integration. Before the new world can breathe on its own, racism, homophobia, and colliding generations must fight for survival. Ghosts from the past dance with the uncertain music of the future creating an imperfect but vibrant culture seeking to understand how to live together in a changing society. This is what happens when yesterday meets tomorrow.

 

 

This summer, Planet Connections Theatre Festivity (PCTF), the brainchild of arts professional Glory Kadigan, turns 10 years old. In that decade, PCTF has successfully changed the landscape of the theatre festival and all of New York independent theatre. The multi-award-winning theatre festival will celebrate in a big way by premiering more than 50 timely and topical plays and musicals written by the next generation of playwrights. Each play contains a powerful message serving as a parable of various world themes. The Tenth Planet: Planet Connections Theatre Festivity will run fromJuly 9 through August 5, 2018 at The Clemente, 107 Suffolk Street, NYC.www.planetconnections.org. Artists presenting works from all across America, including Denver, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Providence and New York City; and from all over the planet, including Japan, Yugoslavia, Russia, Peru, France, Belarus, & Haiti are part of this years festivity.

Ai caught up with playwright, Kelley Nicole Girod, who shared her many artistic adventures. 

As a producer, I am committed to presenting stories by artists of color. As a playwright, I love to write about the Black Cajun/Creole world of Louisiana that I grew up in. I love hearing all those voices every time I write, and smelling the backyard on a hot summer day, or the scent of gumbo on a Fall breeze. It’s my favorite place to escape to, both in my head as a writer, and in real life. 

 

Share with us a little something about your play that we WON’T see in the press release.

You will hear a Cajun “call” Aieeeeeeee!!! at some point during the play.

 

LOVE THAT! OK, This shows us that this a very specific location and thought-process. Is it identifiable on a wider range? How does your play resonate today? Feel free to be blunt. 

The reality of our present day is pushing up against our past in big ways lately in this country. My play addresses our history with racism in America and the structures it has built that are now being dismantled.  Spilling out of this is generational divides, racial tensions, the strains of gentrification, and a literal changing landscape as Louisjana’s coastline (and culture) disappears. 

 

We’ve gotten a ton of varied answers on this … why did you choose Planet Connections for your work?  

I love that Planet Connections is committed to plays that both present timely social issues, as well as present actual foundations that audiences can give to that are linked to the causes brought up in the piece. It allows the artists and the audiences to take that extra step to be proactive once they leave the performance.

Where do you see it going in the future? 

If no dream is too big, let’s say Broadway! 

 

FINALLY! I’ve been waiting for someone with THE dream! What’s the next step?  

Fill the theatre for Planet Connections run!

 

Another Pro Answer! Final thoughts? 

Thank you for this opportunity. 

#TenthPlanet: Anthony P. Pennino

 

Planet Connections Theatre Festivity, the brainchild of arts professional Glory Kadigan, turns 10 years old. In that decade, PCTF has successfully changed the landscape of the theatre festival and all of New York independent theatre. The multi-award-winning theatre festival will celebrate in a big way by premiering more than 50 timely and topical plays and musicals written by the next generation of playwrights. Each play contains a powerful message serving as a parable of various world themes.

Premiering more than 50 original plays & musicals The Tenth Planet: Planet Connections Theatre Festivity will run from July 9 through August 5, 2018 at The Clemente, 107 Suffolk Street, NYC. http://www.planetconnections.org

Across our sites, Five-Star Arts Journals will spotlight this special season with interviews, articles, and reviews.

nuclear-plays-logo.jpgAi talks to ANTHONY P. PENNINO about The Nuclear Plays
In a nuclear war, there are no winners only survivors.

Benefiting Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy

TICKETS
The Flamboyán @ The Clemente
Thursday 7/12 @6:15pm-7:30pm
Saturday 7/14 @3:15pm-4:30pm
Sunday 7/15 @1:00pm-2:15pm
Friday 7/20 @6:15pm-7:30pm
Sunday 7/22 @3:00pm-4:15pm
Thursday 7/26 @8:15pm-9:30pm

A nuclear device explodes at Madison Square Park. Six college students, rehearsing at The Clemente Center, must grapple with the terror of what for them is an unknown horror. Told in a series of short pieces that mix tragic, comedic, and documentary styles, The Nuclear Plays tells, from the perspective of those just staring out on life, the sobering consequences of nuclear war and its aftermath in a world that has largely forgotten the dangers of the ultimate conflict. A project commissioned by the Reinventing Civil Defense Project to educate the public about nuclear risk.

OK, let’s start with you… tell us about yourself as an artist

My whole self – left brain and right brain – is devoted to theatre. As a playwright, I believe that theatre exists to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable, to put the spotlight on the marginalized, to give voice to the voiceless, to tell the narrative and stories that the dominant culture may not want to hear. My plays tackles controversial subjects such as police shootings in the African-American community, attacks on immigrants, and our seemingly endless wars. I have been awarded two fellowships from the New Jersey Council on the Arts, had numerous plays published, and seen my work produced across the world. Additionally, I teach literature and theatre at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ. My book Staging the Past in the Age of Thatcher: “The History We Haven’t Had will be published by Palgrave Macmillan UK later this year, and I have written articles on William Shakespeare and August Wilson. I hold an MFA in Playwriting from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in Drama from the University of London.

You are a Renaissance Man for sure! OK, let’s dig deeper… share with us a little something about your play that we WON’T see in the press release.

This play emerged from an investigation launched by the Reinventing Civil Defense Project, which is exploring different ways we think (or don’t think) about nuclear risk in the present moment. In the past, there was a great deal of education – faulty though it may be – about what to do in case there was a nuclear attack (think “Duck and Cover”). And so the Project is exploring ways to talk about nuclear risk and trying to answer such questions as: how do we educate the populace – particularly the young  – about nuclear war? how much is too much? when does information become panic? And so, this is one part of that project. They are also looking at graphic novels, computer games, and art installations.

Wow. Things don’t change. I was going to ask if your play resonates today? I guess it does, Tell us about it. Feel free to be blunt.

We are careening toward nuclear crises with Iran and North Korea, and, if you are younger than, say 40, you really have no idea what that means. There was an article in The Weekly Standard recently that claimed we could easily shake off a nuclear attack. So, the job of the play is to put the issue front and center (sometimes in humorous ways, sometimes in dramatic ways).The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) has a mission to eliminate the risk of nuclear war by eliminating nuclear weapons. This play ultimately shares that mission.

Theatre is best when its a cautionary tale. Why did you choose Planet Connections to get the word out?  

I have worked with Planet Connections before. They are always jonesing for political theatre, and I am more than happy to feed that addiction.

They – and you – are to be commended. PC doesn’t mean politically correct in your case. Where do you see it going in the future? What’s the next step?  

What I am doing at Planet Connections is kind of a beta test for the project. I hope to learn a lot about the play myself. The ultimate goal is that it is something that can be performed at high schools and colleges, and I want to see what works and what doesn’t. I am working with the Reinventing Civil Defense folks to get that ball rolling, and I have some nibbles.

Final thoughts?

I’ve never done something quite like this before, so I am flying without a net. But it is exciting, and I think important to put this issue – which paradoxically everyone agrees is important but also no one thinks about – front and center in a way that makes sense dramatically and theatrically.